Many Kentucky and Indiana animal shelters at full capacity due to return of “pandemic pets”

Pandemic pets: Animals adopted during the pandemic to keep people company. However, as people return to work and life returns to semi-normal, local animal shelters say people are returning their pets at an alarming rate. The Animal Protection Association in Jeffersonville, Indiana, is nearing capacity with 35 cats. The no-kill shelter can no longer accommodate cats because too many people have recently returned their animals. Denise Koenig, communications manager for APA, said there were numerous phone calls and filing attempts every day. Just this Saturday, someone left a cat at the door. Some cats are even returned after more than 10 years of possession. “It’s so hard to think how confused they must be, how hurt they must be, how broken they must be,” Koenig said. Kaydee’s Promise, a cat hospitality organization, is also at full capacity. The organization bought a dozen cats during the pandemic which have been returned in the past 10 days. Melanie Connors, president of Kaydee’s Promise, said adoptions were down about 72%. “When you run out of room, you have no room,” Connors said. “So unfortunately a lot of these cats and kittens are either going to end up in shelters with high mortality or they are going to end up on the streets.” Louisville Metro Animal Service is picking up more stray dogs this year than in 2020. A spokesperson for LMAS said 536 animals were returned in the past month, including stray animals and animals returned by appointment. At the same time last year, around 450 were returned. That’s almost 90 more animals. Koenig hopes people realize that the decision to buy a pet is not just a purchase, but also a promise. “You don’t get a disposable item,” she said. “You get a long term commitment that you can love your whole life, and a cat who will definitely love you your whole life.” Louisville Metro Animal Services will be attending an upcoming national adoption event. LMAS will join the Bissell Pet Foundation to make adoptions free at the Animal House Adoption Center. The event, called “Emptying the Shelters”, runs from July 9 to 11. Metro Animal Services have also removed fees for people who pick up pets for the rest of July.

Pandemic pets: Animals adopted during the pandemic to keep people company.

However, as people return to work and life returns to semi-normal, local animal shelters say people are returning their pets at an alarming rate.

The Animal Care Association in Jeffersonville, Indiana is nearing capacity with 35 cats. The no-kill shelter can no longer accommodate cats because too many people have recently abandoned their animals.

Denise Koenig, communications manager for APA, said there were numerous phone calls and filing attempts every day. Just this Saturday, someone left a cat at the door. Some cats are even returned after more than 10 years of possession.

“It’s so hard to think how confused they must be, how hurt they must be, how broken they must be,” Koenig said.

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Kaydee’s Promise, a cat hospitality organization, is also at full capacity. The organization bought a dozen cats during the pandemic which have been returned in the past 10 days. Melanie Connors, president of Kaydee’s Promise, said adoptions were down about 72%.

“When you run out of room, you have no room,” Connors said. “So unfortunately a lot of these cats and kittens are either going to end up in shelters with high mortality or they are going to end up on the streets.”

Louisville Metro Animal Service is collecting more stray animals this year than in 2020. A spokesperson for LMAS said 536 animals were returned in the past month, including stray animals and animals returned by appointment. . At the same time last year, around 450 were returned. That’s almost 90 more animals.

Koenig hopes people realize that the decision to have a pet is not just a purchase, but also a promise.

“You are not buying a disposable item,” she said. “You get a long term commitment that you can love your whole life, and a cat who will definitely love you your whole life.”

Louisville Metro Animal Services will be attending an upcoming national adoption event.
LMAS will join the Bissell Pet Foundation to make adoptions free at the Animal House Adoption Center. The event, called “Emptying the Shelters”, runs from July 9 to 11.

Metro Animal Services also removed fees for people picking up pets for the remainder of July.


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